Music faculty consistently neglected

I have become a loyal reader of The Cord over my three years thus far at Laurier, and it never ceases to amaze me how utterly neglected the Music Faculty is.

As a publication aimed at representing the entire campus, you seem to be missing the entire goings on of one important building that the majority of students pass through every day.

The John Aird building houses a world class music faculty, complete with professors that are arguably the best in North America, as well as promising hopefuls who are already being recognized at the national and international level.

What people don’t know is that though we are a small faculty, we are just as well known in our respective circles as the business programs that Laurier so willingly boasts about.

Though The Cord has made attempts in the past to write articles about our concerts, the majority
have been so full of mistakes and a clear lack of research, that they’re hardly worth reading for anything more than a laugh (Opera Laurier, anyone?).

However, what irked me the most was that there was absolutely no mention of the music faculty anywhere in the last edition of The Cord, a supposed review of the past decade.

Have we, as a faculty, really made that little of an impact?

Through reading The Cord, it would seem that Laurier has failed to notice that we too have undergone a complete renovation of our facilities in the past year, while the renovation of every other building on campus seems to be the topic of immense conversation.

In our experience as a faculty, however, the rest of the school sure has noticed.

With the renovations has come a string of major thefts (unreported by Bag O’ Crime), vandalism, and the occupation of our rooms, pianos and study spaces by those not within the faculty.
By all means, I would welcome the interest of the wider student body in our faculty.

But, unfortunately, without so much as a nod from The Cord, I fear that the attention we attract as a faculty will continue to be towards our new equipment, rather than the beautiful music we are here to make.

–Kristen Morrison

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