The sweet rush of doing a good deed

Photo by Tanzeel Sayani

 

The only reason I do nice things for others is so I can feel the rush of the “good deed.”

There’s no better feeling than rolling up my sleeves and helping someone in need as a way of indulging myself with that precious influx of endorphins when I hear the words “thank you” or “I appreciate that.”

I used to think the only way I could attain that warm and fuzzy feeling that comes with helping others was to be absurdly wealthy. That’s why I’ve always fantasized about having seemingly infinite funds and graciously using my fortune to help people in need.

Given unlimited access to funds, I would strive to feed my self-righteous cravings by becoming the so-called “Batman of finance.”

In these fantasies, I’d anonymously buy out wealthy pharmaceutical companies and make medications dirt cheap. I’d overhear people talking of their financial woes in bars or coffee shops and pay off their mortgages, you know, just because. I’d send anonymous donations to amazing organizations who allocate their funds toward the betterment of the world.

The cost of living selflessly is a hefty one, but one that’s always worth it in the end for that luscious feeling of satisfaction. So give being selfless a try sometime — you deserve it.

Anything to confirm to myself that I really am a good person or help me bask in my own selfless altruism.

I’ve come to realize that, as an average student who doesn’t just have no money, but in fact, has negative money making a positive change to someone’s day doesn’t require a fat wallet, but, instead, a fat heart.

I made this discovery one day while walking through the hallways of Wilfrid Laurier when a kind stranger shot me a quick smile as they walked by. Up until that point I’d been having a bad day, but that small gesture of kindness reminded me that there are friendly strangers in the world who care about the well-being of others.

It was a nice feeling, and that person probably doesn’t even realize that they had put a positive spin on my lousy day — which, in my opinion, is quite a waste of a good deed.

This small act made me realize that anyone can be a mediocre Batman. A simple smile at a stranger, holding the door open for someone, telling a loved one something you appreciate about them, or going out of your way to donate blood are examples of spreading realistic levels of positivity and making the world a tiny bit better for those around you. But more importantly, they are great ways of feeling the sweet, sweet rush of the good deed.

My advice for those trying to treat themselves by being nice to others is to simply indulge yourself whenever you can. You’ll feel great if you smile at someone because you made their day slightly better.

You’ll get a rush if you notice someone has dropped their papers and you stop to help pick them up. You can keep the feeling of the ‘good deed’ going all day by simply putting in the effort of positivity.

The cost of living selflessly is a hefty one, but one that’s always worth it in the end for that luscious feeling of satisfaction. So give being selfless a try sometime — you deserve it.

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