“The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina” charms Netflix audiences

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On Oct. 26, the long anticipated The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina premiered on Netflix. Though it may not be the horror fix you’re looking for, it’s worth the watch whether you’re a fan of the comics or earlier adaptations or not.

If you’re a fan of Riverdale, the highest marketing point of Sabrina as the two shows have the same executive producers and happen in the same universe, it’s not exactly the same. 

As a casual fan of both shows, I find Sabrina less annoying than Riverdale. Sabrina has less predictable writing, makes less terrible choices on the ends of the characters, and, well, plot lines that actually keep you engaged instead of frustrated. No side projects or new bands in this one!

What Sabrina does keep from the beloved campy buddy-cop comedy turned romantic horror that is Riverdale, is its appeal to a wide age group. Though there are certainly some scary sequences that made me jump, they’re nothing compared to Netflix’s smash horror hit this season, The Haunting of Hill House. 

Aunt Hilda could be seen as the token fat character in the series, but she’s more than that as well. She’s motherly, sure, but she’s also wildly violent when necessary. Rather than being reduced to a mother figure, she’s seen as both caring and irresponsible.

Sabrina deals with the occult in every episode — she is a half-witch, after all. However, the majority of the series focuses on her relationships with the witches, warlocks and humans around her. 

All things considered, it’s a very progressive show as well. From Sabrina starting a feminist club at her high school, affectionately called WICCA, to several gay characters in different positions throughout the show, representation certainly isn’t lacking. 

The character of Ambrose Spellman, a young black man who’s chasing the affections of another man named Luke Chalfant, is a personal favourite of mine.
     Ambrose is studious, charming, funny and has many more problems than those you typically see in characters like him. 

Aunt Hilda could be seen as the token fat character in the series, but she’s more than that as well. She’s motherly, sure, but she’s also wildly violent when necessary. Rather than being reduced to a mother figure, she’s seen as both caring and irresponsible. 

One of the best parts of the show is how this mismatched family supports each other, but also has its issues that the characters have to work through together. 

Overall, Sabrina is great for anyone who can handle a little horror, but fist pumps when the guy gets the guy or the girl stands up to the man.
     It’s charming, pun intended, and you’ll get invested in it in a way that you can’t with Riverdale — you don’t have to preface your love of Sabrina without first mentioning how bad you know it is. 

If you’re looking for something to jump and laugh at with your feminist friends at the end of a long midterm season, Sabrina has 10 awesome hours for you to enjoy. 

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