LSP survey digs deep into students’ V-Day thoughts

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Graphic by Kash Patel

Laurier Student Poll (LSP) conducted a survey over the past week asking Wilfrid Laurier University students about their thoughts on relationships, sex, dating apps and their mindset during Valentine’s Day.

The survey was conducted online and in-person, receiving 211 responses from various undergraduate and master’s students at Wilfrid Laurier University.

57 per cent of the respondents identified as females while 43 per cent identified as males.

54 per cent respondents admitted to currently being in a relationship. 49 per cent of the female respondents said that they were in a relationship, while only 38 per cent of the male respondents said that they were in a relationship.

55 per cent of the female students said that they celebrate Valentine’s Day, while 58 per cent of the male students said that they celebrate Valentine’s Day.

These statistics are to be expected since Valentine’s Day is a holiday that is much more prevalent between the younger part of the population.

The fact that a higher percentage of the male respondents celebrate the holiday than the female respondents even though not as many males are in a relationship shows the progression and development of how individuals celebrate Valentine’s Day.

The holiday has now become more about family and self-love than ever and these statistics are evidence of that.

Although this number is not alarmingly high, it can be hypothesized that a good portion of the Laurier student body feels socially pressurized by Valentine’s Day and therefore they are more likely to find themselves sexually active or in a relationship during this time of the year.

70 per cent of the students stated that they are sexually active. 63 per cent of the female respondents said that they are sexually active, while 78 per cent of the male respondents said that they are sexually active. The percentage of sexually active students increased as the age of the students increased.

The results for the percentage of sexually active students were as follows: 42 per cent of first-year students, 71 per cent of second-year students, 74 per cent of third-year students and 78 per cent of fourth-year students are sexually active. There were a small number of fifth-year students who responded to the survey, but since the sample size is too small, the results for their responses have not been presented.

Another question that was asked in the survey was whether or not students feel lonelier during Valentine’s Day. 57 per cent of the respondents said that they do not feel lonelier on Valentine’s Day.

It can be hypothesized that since Valentine’s Day is not only about romantic relationships anymore, people who are not in a relationship have greater incentive to celebrate without feeling lonely.

It can also be hypothesized that since the respondents of the survey are in a university setting, they are more likely to be surrounded by friends and prospective romantic partners, which can reduce the loneliness feeling.

67 per cent of the students said that they are satisfied with their current relationship status and sex life.

41 per cent of the respondents said that they are more likely to look for a relationship or be sexually active around Valentine’s Day time.

Although this number is not alarmingly high, it can be hypothesized that a good portion of the Laurier student body feels socially pressurized by Valentine’s Day and therefore they are more likely to find themselves sexually active or in a relationship during this time of the year.

The survey also asked students about dating apps and which app was their preferred choice. 44 per cent of the respondents said that they use Tinder, 14 per cent said that they use Bumble, 2 per cent said that they use Grindr, 3 per cent said that they use a different app that wasn’t listed and 37 per cent said that they do not use dating apps.

Finally, the last question on the survey asked the students if they are more likely to use dating apps during Valentine’s Day time, and only 26 per cent of the respondents said that they are more likely to use them. This result continues the theme of the romantic relevance of Valentine’s Day perhaps not being as high as it has been in the past.

It can be hypothesized that since people are now focusing on self and family love during Valentine’s Day more than ever, they do not find it necessary to use dating apps just because it is Valentine’s Day. 

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