Features

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Laurier alumna, Laura Douglas, discusses finding fulfilling careers after your diploma

Unless you’re in a major like accounting or engineering, your future career goals aren’t usually announced in the title of your degree, leaving a world of possibility and opportunity for the frightening world beyond your diploma. We’re told that degrees open up multitudes of doors, but I think it’s important to note that they also show you doors that you […]

by Madeline McInnis· · Features ·
NEWSFLASH: Biodiversity in university makes students thirsty

NEWSFLASH: Biodiversity in university makes students thirsty

In 2007, Kate Middleton and Prince William ended their relationship after nearly four years in the spotlight. The BBC reported on this end of an era, claiming that the breakup was due to the grounding and locale of their relationship. William and Kate were university sweethearts. As per the article’s author, university relationships are often crushed when the members leave […]

by Karlis Wilde· · Features ·
Photo by Luke Sarazin

Where universities fall short with mental health resources

On 2018’s Bell Let’s Talk Day, the twitter page @SpottedLaurier published three tweets directed toward the wellness centre on campus. “#bellletstalk about how the Wellness Centre turned me away during crisis hours because I wasn’t going to kill myself.. but all I needed was someone to talk to that day.” The anonymous tweet was published at 3:56 am. The one […]

by Shyenne MacDonald· · Features ·
A walk down Ezra: The history of Laurier’s most resilient party

A walk down Ezra: The history of Laurier’s most resilient party

“There will be no big street party this year, next year, or any other year, because it will be broken up…” Tricia Siemens, Waterloo councillor, in an interview with The Record, April 19, 1995. In The Cord’s 1995 coverage of the Ezra Street party, Amanda Dowling wrote about “the largest, wildest version of the annual Ezra Street Party.” The event […]

by Karlis Wilde· · Features ·
From the grounds up: understanding the appeal of coffee

From the grounds up: understanding the appeal of coffee

Coffee is a staple of my every day routine. There’s something gratifying about brewing coffee each morning or entering a local coffee shop that’s filled with the aroma of coffee. However, I’m often left wondering what it is about coffee that is so appealing. Being that coffee has little nutritional value — and I’m sure I’m not alone in experiencing […]

by Safina Husein· · Features ·
Graphic by Alan Li

A look at textbook costs in the era of #textbookbroke

The cost of textbooks has been a topic of discussion and debate more or less since they were first invented, but the conversation has taken a significant turn lately as the #textbookbroke hashtag began trending earlier this year. The textbook industry is a strange one, without many direct comparisons. It is synergistically powered by the education industry to a point […]

by Karlis Wilde· · Features ·
Photo by Tanzeel Sayani

Me, Myself and I Do: taking a look at sologamy, the unusual phenomenon of people marrying themselves

“It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.” It’s unusual how much the modern world looks to Jane Austen. Whether or not you’ve studied English at any level, it’s likely that you’ve heard or read these words — the opening line to Pride & Prejudice […]

by Karlis Wilde· · Features ·
File Photo / Victoria Panacci

Presidential: a retrospective of the last ten years of Students’ Union presidents

Following a messy voting period — one of the presidential candidates was disqualified from the race on the day of the election — Le Fevre ultimately won a vote that only 11.01 per cent of the student body participated in. His term was marked by several features, including the need to deal with a significant influx to the student population. […]

by Karlis Wilde· · Features ·
Graphic by Tanzeel Sayani

Degrees for Download: online learning and concerns for the future

  Your professor is linked to a circuitboard. Your professor no longer dresses up in a gaudy shirt and tie, because your professor doesn’t dress up at all. Your professor sits comfortably in the central stream of a database, overflowing with data, ready to project quantifiable trends and employ algorithms that can accurately determine the quality of your work. This […]

by Karlis Wilde· · Features ·
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Defining Hate Speech across Canada

  The discussion of the discernment between free speech and hate speech is a difficult one, with an especially prominent place on the Wilfrid Laurier campus in recent weeks. There are enormous discrepancies between the types of speech deemed appropriate, and they are all subjectively organized to reflect their own community and their own community’s standards. It is that discernment […]

by Karlis Wilde· · Features ·