Millenials and their manners

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Have you ever noticed how polite grandparents are? They say “please” and “thank you” more than we ever do, they happily engage in small talk with neighbours, retail staff and basically anyone they encounter — regardless of how well they know them. Even our parents seem to have much better manners than we do. It feels like the older generations have better manners than us millennials.

Since as far back as many of us can remember, our generation has been catching heat about our supposed bad manners.

We use more slang in formal settings, dress more casually and have an unconscious obsession with technology. But being overly proper in 2015 doesn’t automatically make you a better person. The definition of being well-mannered has become much broader.

Being a well mannered millennial juggles the best of both worlds — manners and individuality. Though it’s important for guys and girls today to value traditional etiquette for what it’s worth, there are polite things that people did 50 years ago that would be considered strange and outdated.

For example, can you imagine if guys still laid down their jackets on top of puddles for women to walk across? The thought is tremendously admirable but people these days just don’t do that.

So how can millennials be polite in their everyday lives while still remaining with the times? For starters, cutting out swear words now and again can really add to your politeness while still leaving you some room to show some uncensored emotion.

The real trick here is to not sell yourself out. The tip above is just a little things that can help you balance both worlds. There is nothing more frustrating than having to switch from uber-polite robot when around older generations and then switching back to your normal street savvy, slang using, laid-back self.

 


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