Laurier Buy Nothing Day has ‘a healthy turnout’

Laurier students looking to decrease consumerism and promote wiser spending habits found an opportunity in the annual Buy Nothing Day.

Monday marked the return of the event, which was held in the Concourse.

Throughout the day, passersby were welcome to help themselves to various snacks, as well as free board games and books.

Since 2001, Laurier Students’ Public Interest Research Group (LSPIRG) has hosted Buy Nothing Day on campus.

LSPIRG member Morgan Alan explains that the day “makes people realize how much we buy in 24 hours and really puts it into perspective.”

Vancouver-based activism group Adbusters started Buy Nothing Day in 1992. Their idea was to protest the consumerism that they believed was responsible for the destruction of natural ecosystems as well as culture in our society by not spending money for a single day.

What began as a small demonstration in a single city has grown to an annual international event.
In countries throughout the world, Buy Nothing Day has come to symbolize that it is possible for humankind to live in a world free of excessive consumer behaviour.

According to Alan, Laurier’s event had “a healthy turnout with a steady stream of people coming in throughout the day.”

This year’s Buy Nothing Day was slightly different from years past. Due to health concerns relating to the spread of flu, they were unable to serve hot food as they usually do to prevent contamination.

Despite this minor setback, the event still managed to get its message across to Laurier students.
Second-year Laurier student Jessi Stern found that “it was really difficult to avoid spending money all day.

“It made me realize how much money I spend in a day and that there are a lot of things that I don’t really need to buy.”

Many others feel similarly.

Alan explains, “Buy Nothing Day is an event that raises important issues and is something that people are very passionate about.”

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