Arts and Life – The Cord https://thecord.ca The tie that binds Wilfrid Laurier University since 1926 Mon, 19 Nov 2018 23:06:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://thecord.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/logofavicon-32x32.png Arts and Life – The Cord https://thecord.ca 32 32 42727683 Remembrance Day ceremonies commemorate the end of the First World War https://thecord.ca/remembrance-day-ceremonies-commemorate-the-end-of-the-first-world-war/ https://thecord.ca/remembrance-day-ceremonies-commemorate-the-end-of-the-first-world-war/#respond Wed, 14 Nov 2018 12:00:55 +0000 https://thecord.ca/?p=52586

Photo by Eva Ou

For those who had laid a sacrifice of freedom more than a century ago, this past weekend offered a commemoration of the horrors our forefathers experienced so that we might have the opportunity to exist in an era of peace.

This passing Remembrance Day, also known as “Armistice Day,” held on the eleventh hour, of the eleventh day, of the eleventh month, marks the centenary — 100 years — since the official end to the brutalities and losses of the First World War.

Though sources vary in the tolls Canadians faced — upwards of 45,000 and as high as 74,000, with between 120,000 and 150,000 left alive to deal with their various wounds, both physical and psychological — the observance of this solemn day allows for us as a nation to grieve such a loss, whilst remembering what it is we fought for all those years ago — and continue to fight for today.

As such, a number of ceremonies across the Waterloo region paid homage to the soldiers of a war who have since passed.

On Friday Nov. 9, the WLU History Students’ Association (HSA) hosted a ceremony between 10:40 and 11:00 am, which hosted a number of speakers including HSA president Cameron Baer, Dr. Kandace Bogaert and David McMurray, vice-president of student affairs, as well as readings of “In Flanders Fields” in both English and French and the iconic commemorative bugle call during the period of silence, “Last Post.”

There were a number of ceremonies and a parade held throughout the city, as well as a fly-over of the Waterloo Cenotaph by the “Waterloo Warbirds” and a “Bells of Peace” ceremony at 5 p.m., which included the ringing of 100 bells to mark its anniversary. With the last remaining Canadian veteran having died in 2010, over eight years ago and the last remaining veteran, the United Kingdom’s Florence Green in 2012, history distances itself even more from the events of a time that used to exist in living memory.

“After the battle of Amiens, the Second Battle of the Somme, Canal du Nord and Mons — to name just a few of the key battles of Canada’s 100 days — Canada’s veterans would return home to a country that was very different than when they had left,” said Kandace Bogaert, assistant professor and Cleghorn Fellow in War and Society at Laurier, in her speech at the ceremony.

“For me, personally and as a researcher, it’s important to remember, for one, simply because of the staggering contribution of Canada’s soldiers and nursing sisters during the First World War,” Bogaert said.

“The events of 1918 would shape Canada in many ways in the years following … we are here to remember and commemorate the immense sacrifice of our countrymen and women.”

Because of events like those held by the HSA, members of the newest generation are able to exist outside of those who have had to participate in or live through a war, are especially important — as are the messages they feel are important to keep in one’s mind during this time.

“Four years, three months and two weeks — over 1500 days — of death and destruction had come to an end. At long last, it seemed that the world, undeniably exhausted, might finally catch its breath. Tragically, the world was breathless. Nations lay in ruins, tens of millions of people from around the globe, civilian and soldier alike, lay dead.

A whole generation lost to the battlefields of the first world war,” said HSA president Cameron Baer in his speech at the ceremony. “And though the guns were silent, people the world over knew that struggle for peace was only just beginning. The world had to be rebuilt — more than that, it had to build something new out of the ashes of the old and build this new world with the confidence that such a catastrophe would not be repeated … and if not for themselves, then surely for those generations to come, that they might make good on the mistakes of the past.”

Baer went on, discussing how those same mistakes would, unfortunately, be repeated in the years to come, manifesting itself in the built-up anger, fear, blame and resentment that would lead to the equally catastrophic Second World War. He continued, discussing the passing of torches delivered to the next generations — the renewed hopes of a scarred world.

“The world is not always what we might wish it to be. It has seen great evil and great tragedy in the century since Nov. 11, 1918.

But this should not discredit what good, however small, has been done in spite of the challenges we have faced — and should most certainly not discount what potential we have, each and every single one of us, to learn from what has come before, good or bad and to go forward, to work towards something better,” Baer continued.“It is truly tragic that such a loss of life should serve as the foundation on which we must build, which makes it all the more important that we make the most of the chances we are given, to do what they could not,” he concluded.

For Bogaert, the significance of the day echoes many of the words and sentiments of the HSA’s president, as well as her own speech.

“For me, personally and as a researcher, it’s important to remember, for one, simply because of the staggering contribution of Canada’s soldiers and nursing sisters during the First World War,” Bogaert said.

“If you think about it, 60,000 Canadian soldiers died in Europe and around 54 nursing sisters out of 2500 who had served and I think it’s important to recognize those contributions.”

“Remembrance Day, to me, is taking those two minutes of silence to remember the sacrifice of Canada’s veterans in the conflicts of the twentieth and twenty-first century,” she concluded.

]]>
https://thecord.ca/remembrance-day-ceremonies-commemorate-the-end-of-the-first-world-war/feed/ 0 52586
Queer comedy show gets laughs and praise https://thecord.ca/queer-comedy-show-gets-laughs-and-praise/ https://thecord.ca/queer-comedy-show-gets-laughs-and-praise/#respond Wed, 14 Nov 2018 12:00:40 +0000 https://thecord.ca/?p=52588

Photo by Eva Ou

On the night of Nov. 8, the warm atmosphere of Patent Social was a welcome treat after being out in the cold. The bar is a hidden gem in uptown Waterloo on Erb St.

The classy, upscale venue had a small bar and was complemented with fun elements that bring out the child-at-heart, such as popcorn bowls which could be ordered from the menu and video game booths.

And it was the perfect venue for Alice’s Big Queer Comedy Show.

The show has had multiple iterations at Patent Social before the most recent one, bringing together different comedic personalities for a unique experience each time.

I managed to get a front-row seat and saw that Alice had attracted a crowd of varying ages.

 The audience reflected the comedians who had us in stitches by the time the night was over. Alice kicked off the show by talking about her life as a trans woman living in Toronto and her thoughts on sexual and gender identity.

Alice then introduced a line-up of hilarious local comedians such as Velvet Duke, named for his smooth voice, host of the Sad and the City podcast Marisa Bettino, Greg Brown from the AsapScience YouTube channel, as well as  other amazing personalities.

Many of the comedians touched on their experiences as queer-identifying people in the city and jokes on current trends and concerns like cutting down on straws to save the sea turtles and the fact that gay people simply cannot drive under any circumstances.

One of the ongoing jokes of the night was explaining the difference between being pansexual and bisexual to those who don’t identify with the LGBTQ+ community.

It seems as though many people either think they’re the same thing or don’t really understand the concept of pansexuality which often leads to judgement.

Luckily, Marisa deemed the audience ‘cool enough’ to appreciate her material on the subject.

These little tidbits made the show all the more enjoyable, and as a member of the LGBTQ+ community myself, the relatable or downright funny content had me cracking up.

I’m sure I wasn’t the only one who felt this way as well.

For a night, Patent Social was turned into a welcoming and safe space for queer people, an environment where they can feel understood and connect with each other in a way that can be greatly appreciated when one is often surrounded by straight, cisgendered people.

The Velvet Duke actually touched on this subject during his time in the spotlight. He told the story of how he accidentally came out to his female coworkers during a game of Fuck, Marry, Kill (with an emphasis on the good-looking Idris Elba). You may have friends who you can identify with but you can’t be around them 24/7.

For example, more often than not, at work, or in general it might be hard to find people who pine over Idris Elba, or celebrities of the same gender, as much as you do.

Alice and her friends gave us local queers  a place to shake off the cold and our worries for a while, albeit not for long enough and I can’t wait to see what her next show has to offer.

]]>
https://thecord.ca/queer-comedy-show-gets-laughs-and-praise/feed/ 0 52588
Behind the rising popularity of “wellness” and health management https://thecord.ca/why-the-wellness-trend-of-health-management-has-become-popular-recently/ https://thecord.ca/why-the-wellness-trend-of-health-management-has-become-popular-recently/#respond Wed, 14 Nov 2018 12:00:05 +0000 https://thecord.ca/?p=52592

Photo by Yitian Cai

The wellness approach to a more balanced lifestyle is a trend that has taken over social media and health discussions in recent years.

Countless health-related outlets promote “wellness” as being the most effective and positively advocated method to look after ourselves both mentally and physically — from Instagram pages to magazine articles, the way we feel is being prioritized more than ever before.

The Golden Mean Wellness Shoppe & Healthcare Clinic located on King St. West, was opened two years ago with a vision focussed on evidence-based health services and wellness-related products that target a variety of different needs.

The space is relaxed and aesthetically decorated, making you feel calm and at ease when you step into the welcoming storefront.   They have a selection of lifestyle and health-based products for sale such as balms, essential oils, supplements and small gifts, as well as smoothies that are made and sold behind the counter during the summer months, transitioning into teas, coffee and kombucha for the winter.

There is a team of professional healthcare workers available for different purposes, which is an aspect that is continuing to grow.  Currently, Golden Mean offers naturopathy, Reiki, chiropractic and massage therapy services, with plans of bringing in a social worker as well.

Holly Bradich is the manager and nutritionist of the store, with a Bachelor of Applied Science in Nutrition from the University of Guelph and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from the University of Waterloo.

She has an allopathic approach to nutrition and strongly believes in balance and moderation when it comes to diet, regarding wellness as a more comprehensive mentality that should be applied to all aspects of everyday life.

“Unfortunately there is a lot of stuff on the internet that’s not science-based and we are very science-based, especially our naturopath. I think she gets frustrated because there are some naturopaths out there — that even though they’re trained rigorously in scientific methods — some of them divert into different streams that aren’t science-based and it makes the other naturopaths look bad,” she said.

“I believe in optimum wellness. Really feeling your best physically, mentally, energetically. I think the Western model just defines it as the absence of disease, but I don’t really agree with that. I think most people now are trying to reach a more optimal, functioning level and just feeling their best everyday,” Bradich said.

For students especially, wellness can seem like an overwhelming method to apply to their busy lives in order to be more healthy with their habits — but it doesn’t have to be.
     The key is realizing that it’s not “quick fix” but a way of tackling your day-to-day routine in order to help you feel better overall.

“Taking on enough time for your mental health and managing stress and getting your sleep. Kind of like a whole lifestyle [approach] and not just like a ‘I’m gonna go on a fad cleanse,’” Bradich said.

In terms of how popular the wellness approach has become, Bradich sees this as a positive transition.

“I think people are taking a more preventative approach to healthcare because there’s going to be such a strain with all of the boomers aging,” Bradich said.

“A lot of people have these chronic diseases now and we have to be ready as the next generation to step up and take care of these people or teach them how to manage these diseases or prevent them from getting them if they don’t already have them.”

Educating yourself properly is imperative in knowing how to approach wellness and personal healthcare most effectively.

“Unfortunately there is a lot of stuff on the internet that’s not science-based and we are very science-based, especially our naturopath. I think she gets frustrated because there are some naturopaths out there — that even though they’re trained rigorously in scientific methods — some of them divert into different streams that aren’t science-based and it makes the other naturopaths look bad,” she said.

“I think it’s important for people to not just Google something and think they found the right answer.”

“I would hope that university students have the research skills to know when they’re reading something that’s scientifically sound, but with the general public, if they don’t have continued education, then they may not be able to differentiate psuedo-science from real science,” Bradich said.

]]>
https://thecord.ca/why-the-wellness-trend-of-health-management-has-become-popular-recently/feed/ 0 52592
Bohemian Rhapsody dazzles audiences with its depiction of Queen and Freddie Mercury https://thecord.ca/bohemian-rhapsody-dazzles-audiences-with-its-depiction-of-queen-and-freddie-mercury/ https://thecord.ca/bohemian-rhapsody-dazzles-audiences-with-its-depiction-of-queen-and-freddie-mercury/#respond Wed, 07 Nov 2018 12:01:51 +0000 https://thecord.ca/?p=52386

Contributed Image

Growing up, I used to listen to the “Greatest Hits” album by Queen. I would rock out to classics like “We Will Rock You,” “Don’t Stop Me Now”, and “Another One Bites the Dust.”

I would bring the CD to school and listen to it on a portable CD player.

So when I heard that there would be a biopic about Queen, the old memories of singing along in my parents’ living room came flooding back.

Bohemian Rhapsody came out last Friday, and takes an in-depth look at the lead singer of Queen.  Focusing on Freddie Mercury’s personal life and how the band went from playing colleges and bars in 1970, to worldwide success and their legendary 1985 Live Aid concert performance.

It was directed by Bryan Singer, who is known for directing various X-Men movies and The Usual Suspects, and had current Queen band members Brian May and Roger Taylor serve as executive music producers. It took in $50 million in its opening weekend and over $141 million in total, and it’s projected to stay at number one throughout the week.

The movie itself was beautifully done. While it is listed as a drama, it does have its funny moments while also keeping it serious at the right times. For anyone who likes Queen, this movie is a must see.

While the signature music of this band of misfits and the best pump-up music of all time has been gone for a while, Freddie comes back to life in this two hour-long movie based on his life with Queen.

Going into the movie not knowing much about Freddie Mercury’s personal life made it even better to see because I didn’t know what was going to happen. Rami Malek plays the iconic singer and nails every aspect of his character from his infamous moustache and colourful outfits to his over-the-top flamboyant personality.

When compared to the actual 1985 Live Aid concert, it’s  hard to tell the difference because of how well Malek plays the role. The performances by Malek and the rest of the cast really sell the authenticity of their characters and make it look like you are watching the real people they’re portraying.

The movie also balances the story and musical portions perfectly.
One minute you’ll be taken in by the fight between Freddie and Roger Taylor and the next you’ll be singing along with “Another One Bites the Dust.”The personal life story of Freddie Mercury looks at how he struggled at first with his sexuality in the 70s and 80s, a time where the AIDS pandemic unfairly stigmatized homosexuals and bisexuals and how that had an effect on his relationship with Mary Austin.

It also really shows how Queen as a band rose from their early days through the 70s and 80s, the chemistry and the dramatics of the band, to showing how much Freddie saw them as family. The main messages of the movie would be how important family is to someone.

Be it band members, to former lovers , to mothers and fathersFreddie Mercury died on Nov. 24 1991 due to AIDS-related pneumonia.

While the signature music of this band of misfits and the best pump-up music of all time has been gone for a while, Freddie comes back to life in this two hour-long movie based on his life with Queen.

Bohemian Rhapsody is a movie for the ages and it’s one of the best movies of 2018. By the end, you’ll be singing “Bohemian Rhapsody” and “We Are The Champions” all the way home.

]]>
https://thecord.ca/bohemian-rhapsody-dazzles-audiences-with-its-depiction-of-queen-and-freddie-mercury/feed/ 0 52386
Graffiti Market puts a unique spin on the casual restaurant experience https://thecord.ca/graffiti-market-puts-a-unique-spin-on-the-casual-restaurant-experience/ https://thecord.ca/graffiti-market-puts-a-unique-spin-on-the-casual-restaurant-experience/#respond Wed, 07 Nov 2018 12:00:52 +0000 https://thecord.ca/?p=52388

Photo by Yitian Cai

If you’re looking for something new to experience in Waterloo, I would highly recommend heading over to Graffiti Market.

Located at 137 Glasgow Street in Kitchener at Catalyst137 — the world’s largest IoT manufacturing hub — Graffiti Market aims to provide art, technology and great food to their customers.

Graffiti Market, however, is more than a unique place to dine. When first entering Graffiti Market, you’re able to shop and purchase local items in their market.

“There is beer and merchandise as well as fresh fruits and vegetables and cheeses. Everything is local so it’s really nice, we also have a vinyl collection that you can purchase from,” Lindsay Shields, general manager of Graffiti Market, said.

In addition to the market, the restaurant is home to a Four All Ice Cream location — a local ice cream company.

The main portion of the restaurant, aside from the market, is dedicated to dining space as well as their open concept brewery.

“They’re like giant iPads, you can order all of your food and all of your drinks on the table, you can play air hockey and puzzles, there’s a graffiti app … it’s really fun,” Shields said.

“Everything we use is fresh and local,” Shields said.

“We build everything from scratch from our dressings, our pizza dough we bake in house, our pasta is made fresh so we like to focus on the freshness aspect and using quality ingredients.”

Red Circle Brewing, a local micro-brewing company, is also located within Graffiti Market.

“We brew all of our own beer on site, we don’t sell anything else other than our Red Circle Beer,” Shields said.

“Everything is all brewed on site. You can watch them brew throughout the entire day, it’s an open concept brewery — it’s really fun.

One of the main components of Graffiti Market that sets it a part from other restaurants is their electronic tables.

“They’re like giant iPads, you can order all of your food and all of your drinks on the table, you can play air hockey and puzzles, there’s a graffiti app … it’s really fun,” Shields said.

Overall, if you’re looking for great food and some friendly competition between the people you’re with, Graffiti Market is the ideal place for you to check out.

“You can come and hangout with your friends, spend a few hours, have a lot of fun on the table. Drink really good beer and share some pizza and it’s a really fun atmosphere, it’s pretty hip and forward thinking and it’s very tech savvy”

]]>
https://thecord.ca/graffiti-market-puts-a-unique-spin-on-the-casual-restaurant-experience/feed/ 0 52388
Golden Hearth Bakery provides fresh, handmade goods to local community https://thecord.ca/golden-hearth-bakery-provides-fresh-handmade-goods-to-local-community/ https://thecord.ca/golden-hearth-bakery-provides-fresh-handmade-goods-to-local-community/#respond Wed, 07 Nov 2018 12:00:05 +0000 https://thecord.ca/?p=52393

Photo by Yitian Cai

Located on the corner of King and Cedar Street in Kitchener, is a local, 11 year-old confectionery that sells baked goods made completely from scratch with quality, organic ingredients.

Providing a variety of fresh products for both the community and other localities in the area like Gilt Restaurant Bar and Lounge, Legacy Greens, Smile Tiger Coffee Roasters and Vincenzo’s — among several others — Golden Hearth’s simple approach to bakery fare seems to be what makes them so successful and highly praised.

Tavis Weber, the owner of Golden Hearth, had his flour-dusted apron donned and an easy going attitude about his business — which he’s owned for eight years — and his dedicated customer base.

“So we are primarily a sourdough bakery, with sourdough breads, we make our own croissants, cookies, granolas, bit of squares.

We do everything from scratch; we use mostly organic flour or organically grown flour. We supply local cafes, restaurants and health food stores,” Weber said.

Although it may sound like a tired-out cliche, putting love and care into what you make is essential in creating something that people will appreciate just as much in return.

If their 4.9 star rating on Google is any indication, people can’t get enough of their products — especially croissants, which are some of their most popular items.

They offer a collection of delicious sounding viennoiserie goods —baked similarly to bread, but with ingredients that give them a sweeter, heavier quality closer to a pastry — along with frozen pizza dough and perhaps their most sought after selection, their sourdough and yeast-based breads.

Their store reflects their product: uncomplicated, warm and inviting.

With mustard coloured walls and an uncomplicated storefront, customers get a glimpse into their busy kitchen and everything they have to offer.

They regularly sell out of their baked goods early into the opening hours throughout the week, it’s easy to see why.

The combination of the welcoming atmosphere and reliable service makes for a pleasant food shopping experience.

Their chalkboard menu displays their list of pastries and bread for sale at reasonable prices — a selling point for people who don’t want to sacrifice taste and quality for affordability.

In terms of what sets Golden Hearth apart from other bakeries in the area, the answer is simple: their bread — but it’s a lengthy process to get the desired product.

“We’re actually making full sourdoughs, so we don’t put any yeast in our bread — we have a few that have yeast in them — but if we call it a sourdough, its 36 hours, start-to-finish.

So we’ll start a dough on a Monday afternoon, start the starter, mix the dough on a Tuesday and then bake it on Wednesday.

 So it’s a three-day process, same with croissants, they also take that long,” Weber said.

Baking and doing it well is a skill that requires long hours and endless devotion for the products that you’re producing each week.

Although it may sound like a tired-out cliche, putting love and care into what you make is essential in creating something that people will appreciate just as much in return.

“We’re an artisan bakery: we work with our hands, we do everything by hand other than mixing, everything else is done by hand, so it’s a labour of love,” Weber said.

In a time where so many of the things we buy are mass produced by machinery, it’s refreshing to see that an innocuous little bakery can continue flourishing and providing the community with such acclaimed, tasty food made from scratch. Golden Hearth Bakery is definitely the place to go for high-quality products.

]]>
https://thecord.ca/golden-hearth-bakery-provides-fresh-handmade-goods-to-local-community/feed/ 0 52393
Inclusive DEO event endeavours to be a safe space on campus https://thecord.ca/inclusive-deo-event-endeavours-to-be-a-safe-space-on-campus/ https://thecord.ca/inclusive-deo-event-endeavours-to-be-a-safe-space-on-campus/#respond Wed, 31 Oct 2018 11:01:21 +0000 https://thecord.ca/?p=52246

Photo by Kash Patel

On Wednesday, Oct. 24, between 7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., the Rainbow Centre, the Centre for Women and Trans People and Laurier Students’ Public Interest Research Group (LSPIRG) hosted their  “Love Letters to Inclusive Feminism” event at Wilfrid Laurier. 

Located within the Macdonald House on the Laurier Waterloo campus, it offered a chance for individuals to come together, write, craft and participate in an evening of self-care in an inclusive and supportive environment. 

“The event was meant to be a comfortable space for folks to come together [and] get support: we offered active listening, crafts, relaxing activities, button making, opportunities for expression and chances to talk about how feminism and inclusive movements need to also include trans people, gender non-conforming folks and diverse people as well, especially those in marginalized positions,” said Milas Hewson, administrator of the Rainbow Centre and one of the hosts for the event.

“[So] we wanted to provide a space for folks to have a conversation about that, as well as just find a comfortable, safe space to exist in the context of a lot of nastiness in the states. In Canada, it’s a tricky time to try to exist right now,” they said. 

“Excluding folks from that movement a) implies they’re not really women or that they’re not experiencing this gender based harm and violence and b) really excludes people who have been vital to that movement and erasing that history that’s so important there.”

The other hosts joining them included Amanda Fitzpatrick, coordinator for the Glow Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity and Karly Rath, volunteer and community engagement director from LSPIRG.

One of the main issues they wanted to address was the feeling of loneliness and disconnection from the rest of the community that can often accompany being around the greater area of the campus. 

Having these kinds of events offers a safe space to go and meet other people that have similar experiences and that allow open, honest and non-judgemental communication, that can precipitate sympathy and empathy from individuals that might have had similar experiences

“It’s super important, especially with the general environment that’s going on at a lot of university campuses, a lot of people don’t feel super safe. So it’s really important to have these places where you can build community and you can meet other people,” Fitzpatrick said. 

Accessing feminist spaces has historically been a sizable obstacle for trans and gender non-conforming people.

“It’s interesting because a lot of the time it’s trans folks who have sort of lead those movements in the past and there’s a real rise of that sort of exclusionary version of feminism, when really the position of the Rainbow Centre and I believe the other organizations who hosted this, is feminism is a movement that should be for all women. If your feminism isn’t inclusive, it’s not really feminism,” Hewson said.  

“Excluding folks from that movement a) implies they’re not really women or that they’re not experiencing this gender based harm and violence and b) really excludes people who have been vital to that movement and erasing that history that’s so important there.”

With regard to events in the future, as part of “16 days of activism,” the CTW and Rainbow Centre are partnering on an event regarding trans activism and its history in North America, as well as continuing trans allyship workshops and fulfilling the need for supportive spaces.

The Glow Center will also be hosting a Trans Day Remembrance vigil, as well as an event specifically for trans women of colour and will be continuing to advocate for intersectional events across the university campuses. 

]]>
https://thecord.ca/inclusive-deo-event-endeavours-to-be-a-safe-space-on-campus/feed/ 0 52246
Businesses should leave 90s gimmicks in the past https://thecord.ca/businesses-should-leave-90s-gimmicks-in-the-past/ https://thecord.ca/businesses-should-leave-90s-gimmicks-in-the-past/#respond Wed, 31 Oct 2018 11:00:34 +0000 https://thecord.ca/?p=52316

Graphic by Kash Patel

As I exited the cold exterior of Queen Street and entered the elegant interior of The Walper Hotel, the sound of EMF’s ‘Unbelievable’ flooded my ears. 

I walked up to the second floor lounge and was greeted with the sight of 11 people: A group of five people sitting at a table who appeared to be playing a card game of some sort (upon further inspection they were all just on their phones), three at the bar, two bartenders and a DJ in the corner standing behind a MacBook.

This was The Lokal’s 90s night.

This general vibe continued on into the night with “DJ Good DR” spinning hits that were just 90s enough to appease the crowd who came for this reason. 

Unfortunately, that crowd was non-existent.

The general atmosphere in the establishment was as if a bunch of children had taken over the sound system in a smoking lounge. 

The juxtaposition of middle-aged individuals sipping wine and beer while Matt Nathanson’s ‘Laid’ —most famously known as the American Pie song — played was an entertaining sight at the very least.

I don’t want to attack anybody here or disparage any business for trying to get more business with a draw like a themed music night, but I cannot sit here and lie about my experience. 

It’s no secret that looking back at the past with rose-tinted glasses is a favourite past-time of many people on the planet, but businesses have to understand that they need to include substance along with their capitalization on their consumers.

Disregarding the music, I had a pleasant time.

The staff was very welcoming and polite, and they had alcohol, but that’s not why I was there. 

The music did pick up a little while later with the inclusion of more recognizable hits from the era that was advertised on the pamphlets, but then it died out as unimpressively and abruptly as it started — the end of a technotronic song marking the end of the evening.

During my time spent at The Lokal, I had a few questions in mind in regards to their themed night. 

I was curious as to whether these themed nights were popular, and that answer was given to me without any mistake as soon as I entered the lounge at the start of my evening. 

Although the night was advertised in an attempt to garner more business, there were no more people there than there would have been during regularly.

These people obviously came to drink in a pseudo-upscale setting with their friends, and the music did not impact their choice one way or another.

But why a 90s night? Obviously, there has to be a reason to use that focus to try and get people to come and drink at your bar instead of any other bar in the city. 

I think it boils down to nostalgia, but more importantly the perceived importance of nostalgia in the eyes of businesses. 

It’s no secret that looking back at the past with rose-tinted glasses is a favourite past-time of many people on the planet, but businesses have to understand that they need to include substance along with their capitalization on their consumers. 

Having a night where you play music that is vaguely 90’s is not going to inspire anyone to visit your business unless they have another reason to be there; like writing an article for the school paper, for example.

]]>
https://thecord.ca/businesses-should-leave-90s-gimmicks-in-the-past/feed/ 0 52316
“The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina” charms Netflix audiences https://thecord.ca/the-chilling-adventures-of-sabrina-charms-netflix-audiences/ https://thecord.ca/the-chilling-adventures-of-sabrina-charms-netflix-audiences/#respond Wed, 31 Oct 2018 11:00:33 +0000 https://thecord.ca/?p=52252

Contributed Image

On Oct. 26, the long anticipated The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina premiered on Netflix. Though it may not be the horror fix you’re looking for, it’s worth the watch whether you’re a fan of the comics or earlier adaptations or not.

If you’re a fan of Riverdale, the highest marketing point of Sabrina as the two shows have the same executive producers and happen in the same universe, it’s not exactly the same. 

As a casual fan of both shows, I find Sabrina less annoying than Riverdale. Sabrina has less predictable writing, makes less terrible choices on the ends of the characters, and, well, plot lines that actually keep you engaged instead of frustrated. No side projects or new bands in this one!

What Sabrina does keep from the beloved campy buddy-cop comedy turned romantic horror that is Riverdale, is its appeal to a wide age group. Though there are certainly some scary sequences that made me jump, they’re nothing compared to Netflix’s smash horror hit this season, The Haunting of Hill House. 

Aunt Hilda could be seen as the token fat character in the series, but she’s more than that as well. She’s motherly, sure, but she’s also wildly violent when necessary. Rather than being reduced to a mother figure, she’s seen as both caring and irresponsible.

Sabrina deals with the occult in every episode — she is a half-witch, after all. However, the majority of the series focuses on her relationships with the witches, warlocks and humans around her. 

All things considered, it’s a very progressive show as well. From Sabrina starting a feminist club at her high school, affectionately called WICCA, to several gay characters in different positions throughout the show, representation certainly isn’t lacking. 

The character of Ambrose Spellman, a young black man who’s chasing the affections of another man named Luke Chalfant, is a personal favourite of mine.
     Ambrose is studious, charming, funny and has many more problems than those you typically see in characters like him. 

Aunt Hilda could be seen as the token fat character in the series, but she’s more than that as well. She’s motherly, sure, but she’s also wildly violent when necessary. Rather than being reduced to a mother figure, she’s seen as both caring and irresponsible. 

One of the best parts of the show is how this mismatched family supports each other, but also has its issues that the characters have to work through together. 

Overall, Sabrina is great for anyone who can handle a little horror, but fist pumps when the guy gets the guy or the girl stands up to the man.
     It’s charming, pun intended, and you’ll get invested in it in a way that you can’t with Riverdale — you don’t have to preface your love of Sabrina without first mentioning how bad you know it is. 

If you’re looking for something to jump and laugh at with your feminist friends at the end of a long midterm season, Sabrina has 10 awesome hours for you to enjoy. 

]]>
https://thecord.ca/the-chilling-adventures-of-sabrina-charms-netflix-audiences/feed/ 0 52252
Thrifting in KW for sustainable fashion https://thecord.ca/thrifting-in-kw-for-sustainable-fashion/ https://thecord.ca/thrifting-in-kw-for-sustainable-fashion/#respond Wed, 31 Oct 2018 11:00:01 +0000 https://thecord.ca/?p=52250

Photo by Yitian Cai

Thrifting and vintage shopping have turned into a rising trend in a time where sustainable fashion and the ethics surrounding it are becoming more valued in terms of how and where we shop. 

Fast fashion dominates a large portion of clothing sales, which multiple large corporations have been revealed to make in order to produce their products at massive rates. 

Cheap, low-quality accessories and clothing items that are made by the hands of workers who are paid below minimum-wage, in factories with questionable work environments, are the consequence of the fast fashion shopping world we live in. 

The environment also takes a hit when clothes are produced at such high rates in such large quantities. These short-lived purchases are inevitably thrown away within a year or less because their mediocre quality can’t withstand longterm wear, with these items ending up in landfills as a result. 

This is where thrifting provides a positive alternative to these questionable clothing practices. 

Whether you’re new to finding thrift store wear or you’re an esteemed secondhand shopper, the key to finding what you want for the most reasonable price is going to the right stores to do it. 

Thrift shopping is often associated with chain stores like Value Village and Talize. 

Although these places offer affordable options and some unique finds, they aren’t the only choic-es you can go to and they aren’t necessarily the best if you’re looking for more to buy than your yearly Halloween costume. 

Secondhand does not mean second best, and it’s apparent with stores like White Tiger Vintage Boutique that you aren’t sacrificing style or quality for a thrifty purchase.

White Tiger Vintage Boutique, located on King St. East, is a modest-sized store that operates to the beat of its own drum — marked by its distinct black and white signage out front and eye-catching window displays that alternate depending on seasonal fashion trends. 

Walking inside feels like stepping into a treasured and lovingly organized time capsule, and it’s clear that the store is a work of labour and care to the products they sell. 

With busy walls, eclectic decor and a homey setting, White Tiger’s atmosphere is reminiscent of an inviting 1970s living room, its vibe effortlessly cool and relaxed.  

White Tiger’s style savvy owner, Miranda Campbell, opened the store back in 2011, having been an avid vintage shopper herself in high school. 

“I just really loved vintage clothing, I had a lot of clothes saved up over time from thrifting, so I had a collection. I just had an idea that I wanted to open up a shop like this,” Campbell said. 

All of the stock you see in her store has been carefully chosen and has arrived from a variety of places in and out of the country. 

“I travel quite a bit, so I’ll go to thrift stores along the way. I was just in Montreal last weekend, so I picked up a lot of stuff there and I went to the States in the summer. I like to travel around to get stuff, but I will look around locally and people will bring stuff in for me,” Campbell said. 

Unlike other thrift stores, White Tiger has a selection of clothes that are specifically picked out and cared for before they’re on sale. 

“I wash and I clean all of our clothes and we do a lot of repairs. We put a lot into just putting it onto the floor. Coming in here, it’s more selected than going into a thrift shop, because you have to sort through a lot of stuff,” Campbell said. 

“All of this denim and all of this leather is just made so much better than clothes now, so it actual-ly lasts a lot longer,” she said. 

The quality is immediately clear just by looking at the clothes, accessories and shoes they have in store. Stacks of Levi jeans look close to brand new and racks of fall-coloured leather coats appear barely worn. 

“Fashion always repeats itself. Every single year, there’s always another era that becomes more strong,” Campbell said.  

Secondhand does not mean second best, and it’s apparent with stores like White Tiger Vintage Boutique that you aren’t sacrificing style or quality for a thrifty purchase. 

]]>
https://thecord.ca/thrifting-in-kw-for-sustainable-fashion/feed/ 0 52250